Positive Discipline Parenting Course (May 2015)

freddie-and-prueFreddie & Prue are presenting another Positive Discipline parenting course in May 2015 (dates updated, see below).

Positive Discipline is a skills based course, presented in an interactive group environment, where participants learn valuable tools to instil discipline at home, without reverting to punishments or rewards.

  • Consecutive course dates: Sunday 10th, 17th & 24th May10am-1pm (updated dates, we forgot about Mothers Day so we’ve pushed everything back a week)
  • Venue: Montessori East school, 8 Wellington Street, Bondi
  • Cost: $190 for single and partner can attend for an extra $60

Full details can be found on the Relationship Help website.
Spaces are limited, to register, click here.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Enrolments now open for new Positive Discipline parenting course in March 2014

Positive Discipline Parenting Course

freddie-and-prueFreddie & Prue are offering a new parenting course in March, designed to help parents & carers create a respectful and loving relationship with their children. This is a skills based course, presented in an interactive group environment, where participants learn valuable tools to instil discipline at home, without reverting to punishments or rewards.

  • Dates: Sunday 9th, 16th and 23rd March 2014, 10am-1pm
  • Venue: Montessori East school, 8 Wellington Street, Bondi
  • Cost: $190 for single and partner can attend for extra $60

Full details can be found on the attached brochure and website.
Spaces are limited, to register, CLICK HERE

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Positive parenting tips: TEARLESS DROP-OFFS AND PICK-UPS

Slow down. Being in a hurry creates tension that children can sense. Stressful situations make fertile ground for tears and tantrums.

  • Have your children help you get ready the night before.
  • If your child misses you, give them something of yours they can put in their pocket to help them remember you.
  • Avoid over drawn out, over-comforting good-byes. Be confident that your child will be fine. Create a fun routine instead.
  • Before you arrive to pick up your child, put yourself “in the mood” – clear your mind of work, chores, dinner so that you can be totally available to your child. Take three deep relaxing breaths as you walk in the door.
  • Make sure your face lights up when you see your child. Take a moment to give your child undivided attention before you leave.

Try saying:

“I’ll walk you in, you put up your backpack, I’ll give you a hug and kiss, then a high five, and I leave.”

“I know you are going to have a lot of fun here even if you miss me a bit.”

“It’s so great to see you!”

From Kath Kvols, www.redirecting childrensbehavior.com

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Dealing with power struggles and setting limits

by Lois Haultain and Karan Simms

“No, I won’t and you can’t make me!” That’s what a toddler’s folded arms and defiant looks seem to say. It’s an invitation to a power struggle, which is the main misbehaviour from childhood we take through to adulthood. It often takes a new parent by surprise, stirring up feelings of anger and resentment , and a desire to “make that child” do whatever it is we’re asking.

Most parents first experience their child’s attempts at autonomy at about age two. They feel challenged and often a battle of wills begins that lasts throughout childhood and the teen years. Parents can turn these trying times into a rewarding growth period for them and their children by shifting their perspective concerning the child’s behaviour and by becoming clever and creative in responding to the child’s perceived “headstrong, rebellious, stubborn, frustrating, negative” behaviour.
Continue reading

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail